Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

The ArchiMate® Landscape map supports using hierarchy in the X- and Y-population. By defining hierarchy you can show the map for only population elements that are defined at a certain level. When hierarchy is defined, the map has selection boxes on the X- and/or Y-axis in which you can select the level that must be shown in the map.

In the figure below, the Landscape map has 3 levels on the X-axis and 2 levels on the Y-axis. The map on the left shows the application components that link business processes and devices. This looks the same as when you would create the map without hierarchy. To create hierarchy, the business processes are connected to locations (in two levels, national and international) and the devices to nodes ("Server cluster"). By selecting different levels the map will show the application components at location level and/or cluster level. The maps in the middle and on the right show examples of different levels.


Example of a Landscape map with hierarchy


In a Landscape map with hierarchy, the objects of the additional levels need to be connected to the objects of the X- and/or Y-population using composition or aggregation relations. You can choose to use hierarchy for both the X- and Y-population, but also for only one of them.

To illustrate the use of levels, the following example is used for creating a Landscape map with levels.

Example

You want to create a Landscape map showing the relationships between business processes and devices, indirectly connected via application components, serving relations, and realization relations, showing the application components in the cells (matrix type "Intermediate object"). Levels of hierarchy are added to show the application components on busines process level and location level, resulting in 3 levels for the X-axis, and on device level and node level, resulting in 2 levels for the Y-axis.

The figure below shows the structure of the model and the view with objects and relations the Landcape map is based on. As can be seen in the view, the business processes are connected to locations via composition relations. The devices are connected to nodes via composition relations. These connections are used to create the hierarchy. Please take note that only one of the locations on top level in the view below is linked for the hierarchy. When creating the map , these unlinked objects will be shown in the map, but they do not have any relations to other objects.

The result will be a Landscape map as shown in the figure above.


Creating a Landscape map with population levels

  1. Add a Landscape map to your model, and open the view. In the model browser, right-click the ArchiMate model or a folder in the model, and choose New > Overview > Landscape map.

  2. Select the map in the view and click  to open the Hierarchy settings windows. Determine for which axis you want to use hierarchy, and select the red cross  next to Use hierarchy in x-population and/or Use hierarchy in x-population.

    For the example Landscape map, both settings are activated.



  3. Next to Hierarchy relation on x-axis and/or Hierarchy relation on y-axis, select the relation through which the hierarchy runs for the x-axis and/or y-axis. It can be a Composition relation or Aggregation relation.

    For the example Landscape map, the Composition relation is selected for both axes because that relation type is used in the example view as shown above.



  4. On the map border, click , and select the objects that must be shown in the top row of the map. They form the X population. Because of the hierarchy that you want to create for the x-axis, not only select the elements on the lowest level, but also the elements of the upper levels that will be used in the hierarchy.

    If needed, add filters. Filters can, for example, be used to select a specific element type by filtering on the basic profile of that type. If you use more than one filter you may need to switch to using OR filtering. By default, filtering in the population window behaves like AND filtering. To switch to OR filtering, click , and then click  in the filter section title. It turns into .

    For the example Landscape map, the Business layer (containing the Business process objects) and Composite elements container (containing the Location objects) are selected. Basic profile filters are added for the Business process objects and the Location objects to show only the objects (the layer and the container also contain relations). Filtering is set to OR.



    As a result, the Landscape map now shows levels for the X-population. By clicking the  you can select the different levels and view them.



  5. Click and select the objects that must be shown in the left column of the chart, the Y-population. Add filters if needed.

    For the example Landscape map, the Technology layer is selected and Basic profile filters are added for the Device objects and Node objects to only show the objects (the layer also contains relations).  Filtering is set to OR.



    As a result, the chart now also shows levels for the Y-population. By clicking the  you can select the different levels and view them.



  6. Click , and select the objects that link the objects from the X- and Y-population indirectly via two relations. The Z-population is used in the map cells. If there is a relation between the objects via the object of the Z-population, the object name will be shown in the map cell. Add filters if needed.

    For the example Landscape map, the Application layer is selected. That is where the Application component objects are located (the intermediate objects). A Basic profile filter for the Application component object is added to only show the objects (the layer also contains relations).



  7. Click , and select the relations between the objects of the Z-population and the X-population. Select the layer in which these relations are located. Do not select the Relations folder within the layer.

    If the relations are located in different layers, you could also choose to select a higher-level section of the model as the population, for example the model itself. This higher-level selection will automatically include all layers in the model. If multiple types of relations are available in this population, add a filter to specify the relation type that must be used in the population.

    Make sure to set the relation direction in accordance with the existing relation direction(s) by clicking  in the population window until the correct direction is shown.

    For the example Landscape map, the Application layer is selected for the ZX-population because that is where the serving relations between the application components (Z-population) and business processes (X-population) are located. There is no need to set a filter.



  8. Click , and select the relations between the objects of the Y-population and the Z-population. Select the layer in which these relations are located. Just like the ZX-population, do not select the Relations folder within the layer and select a higher-level section of the model as population if needed. Use filters if needed and set the correct relation direction.

    For the example Landscape map, the Technology layer is selected because that is where the realization relations between the devices (Y-population) and application components (Z-population) are located. There is no need to set a filter.



Your Landscape map with levels is now ready. To make the object names in the cells more readable, the cell width and height can be adjusted on the Representation tab of the chart properties window.



Please take note that when publishing the Landscape map to HoriZZon, make sure you have selected the levels that you want to present in the map. The levels cannot be changed in the view in a HoriZZon site.



ArchiMate® is a registered trademark of The Open Group.